troubalex

girl gone geek

I still haven’t quite figured out why Miss Piggy is wearing this Egyptian outfit…

I might feel like I’m on vacation for quite a while…
Zoom Info
I might feel like I’m on vacation for quite a while…
Zoom Info

I might feel like I’m on vacation for quite a while…

Marissa Mayer has chosen to take on the momentous task of saving one of the largest technology companies in the world from irrelevance. If she can turn Yahoo around—making decisions as not only as a woman, but as a CEO navigating the business world as it exists today—that will be quite enough.



This Tiny House By Richard Neutra Is A Masterpiece
By Kyle VanHemert, fastcodesign.com
See how the modernist master worked his magic on a 1,000-square-foot home.It’d be nice to live in a house built by a great archi­tect, and you’d think the big­ger the dwelling, the bet­ter. But as evi­denced by this com­pact Cal­i­for­nia home,…

Honey, we bought the wrong house…

This Tiny House By Richard Neutra Is A Masterpiece
By Kyle VanHemert, fastcodesign.com

See how the modernist master worked his magic on a 1,000-square-foot home.

It’d be nice to live in a house built by a great archi­tect, and you’d think the big­ger the dwelling, the bet­ter. But as evi­denced by this com­pact Cal­i­for­nia home,…

Honey, we bought the wrong house…

… because it grooooooooves!

(Source: Spotify)

Depressingly beautiful song which I am happy I backed on Kickstarter. Go, Amanda!

Giving Girls a Startup Chance in Silicon Valley
Lauren Wilson, allthingsd.com
Six­teen tables line the sides of the show­case at the Com­put­er His­to­ry Muse­um in Moun­tain View. Grin­ning mer­chants man each one, entic­ing cus­tomers with their wares. For these star­tups, it’s their chance to make that major sale and…

Quite a nice idea, and a VERY Silicon Valley one.

Giving Girls a Startup Chance in Silicon Valley
Lauren Wilson, allthingsd.com

Six­teen tables line the sides of the show­case at the Com­put­er His­to­ry Muse­um in Moun­tain View. Grin­ning mer­chants man each one, entic­ing cus­tomers with their wares. For these star­tups, it’s their chance to make that major sale and…

Quite a nice idea, and a VERY Silicon Valley one.

Me, this week.

Secret weapon: determination.
Adversary: a big hairy ball of web content.

Me, this week.

Secret weapon: determination. Adversary: a big hairy ball of web content.

(Source: artcartoonsgallery.blogspot.no)

Today is a Feist-day. Which is a good thing.

(Source: Spotify)

1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what’s on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.

2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.

3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don’t just remember music easily, they can’t get it out of their minds, it’s so omnipresent.

4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.

5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind — the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.

6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.

7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can’t do, and to know where to go if they need help.

8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It’s an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians — anybody who deals with other people.

9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.



- Howard Gardner’s seminal Theory of Multiple Intelligences, originally published in 1983, which revolutionized psychology and education by offering a more dimensional conception of intelligence than the narrow measures traditional standardized tests had long applied.  (via explore-blog)